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Hindi (indiano)

thought for the day in english with hindi meaning

Inglese

Thought for the day

Ultimo aggiornamento 2017-06-30
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Hindi (indiano)

thought for the day-meaning

Inglese

Thought for the Day-meaning

Ultimo aggiornamento 2016-07-26
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Hindi (indiano)

dowry system essay in english with hindi meaning

Inglese

Dowry system essay in English with English meaning

Ultimo aggiornamento 2018-12-17
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Hindi (indiano)

thought for the day meaning short thought

Inglese

Thought for the Day meaning short Thought

Ultimo aggiornamento 2016-08-06
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Hindi (indiano)

sukti in sanskrit with hindi meaning

Inglese

Sukti in sanskrit with meaning

Ultimo aggiornamento 2018-02-09
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Hindi (indiano)

10 suktiya in sanskrit with hindi meaning

Inglese

path to naas thi murkhtuaam

Ultimo aggiornamento 2017-02-07
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Hindi (indiano)

10 suktiya in sanskrit with hindi meaning

Inglese

Hindi meaning in Sanskrit verses with X.

Ultimo aggiornamento 2016-11-08
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Hindi (indiano)

Honesty is the best policy English with hindi

Inglese

hindi essay on honesty is the best policy

Ultimo aggiornamento 2015-07-28
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Hindi (indiano)

short essay respecting elders in English with hindi

Inglese

Short Essay in English with Hindi Respekting Elders

Ultimo aggiornamento 2016-04-14
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Hindi (indiano)

For the day

Inglese

For the Day

Ultimo aggiornamento 2016-08-26
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Hindi (indiano)

10 suktiya in sanskrit with hindi meaning and image related to the suktiya

Inglese

10 suktiya in Sanskrit with hindi meaning and image related to the suktiya

Ultimo aggiornamento 2018-11-23
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Hindi (indiano)

basant ne mujhe mukka mara Basant ne mujhe mukka mara in English with examples MyMemory

Inglese

basant ne mujhe mukka mara basant ne mehe mukka mara

Ultimo aggiornamento 2019-01-18
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Hindi (indiano)

I wili wait for the day when i stop loving or the day when you resized u not forget me and live without me

Inglese

Day When You Stop Loving E and C were used Willie Wait For Day Resized When You Forget the knot in the end live Vithut

Ultimo aggiornamento 2017-01-25
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Hindi (indiano)

You may feel sunny and bright today with some of your aggressive streak chased away by specific astral arrangements. Friends and close ones may be surprised to see you radiating such a brightness of spirit and persona and that casts a spell on all of your admirers. Finance (80%) The day is just apt for all types of property related investment. Any property investment undertaken today is likely to be quite effective and high yield. Sales value for the properties purchased today will be pretty high and will propel you towards financial stability for the days to come. Career (88%) You may showcase great professional abilities today. You may be capable of handling all difficult tasks with ease. Good stars are likely to bless you with immense professional capacity today and that may allow you to stay ahead of all competitions on the career front or work place. Health (55%) Stress and tension may take a spike on your life and may make you emotionally as well as physically unstable. You need to give vent to all that causes you stress. Talk it out with a dear friend and release those body shattering negative emotions today. Luck (57%) Your luck factor may fluctuate for you a lot. In career and finance sectors you might be lucky enough whereas in the other sectors, luck may not greet you. Wear a Yellow colored outfit to boost your luck factor. Wear an agate or emerald gemstone to improve your luck factor. Education (45%) Negative thinking may take a toll on your study life today. You need to motivate your own self through self counseling. Talk to a mentor or tutor if that can help you to grapple with the situation. Don’t study continuously; that may make you feel dull and depressed again. Love (45%) You may suddenly come to feel that your love life lost the warmth and spark of the past years. To re-ignite that lost passion and spark, you need to take stock of the realities honestly enough. Understand the root cause of this issue and try to exterminate it from the very core. This email was sent to reshsayed07@gmail.com.You are receiving it because you signed up for Daily horoscope at Knowastro.com or otherwise requested to be included in our mailings. Please add dailyhoroscope@knowastro.com to your safe sender list or address book to ensure that your newsletters are delivered correctly. Remember, every email we send contains a link to unsubscribe. To manage or cancel your free subscription: Click here.

Inglese

QUERY LENGTH LIMIT EXCEDEED. MAX ALLOWED QUERY : 500 CHARS

Ultimo aggiornamento 2016-08-06
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Hindi (indiano)

By Daniel A. Rosenblum 2013, Vol. 5 No. 10 | pg. 2/4 | « » Cite References Print 5 Before the Streets: Livelihoods in Rural Bihar The children of rural Bihar are connected with the rest of India unlike any other time in history. In the district town of Sitamarhi, a place that sits some twenty miles from the Nepal border, the skyline is littered with cell phone towers. On the streets below, walkways are filled with mud, trash, and cow dung. Passersby trough through the mess to buy flee-bitten mitahi (sweets) and the sweltering fruits at nearby stands. For the children of Sitamarhi, they live in this contrast—the severe juxtaposition of “modernity”3 and urbanization with the dilapidated infrastructure surrounding them. The villages within five miles of the district town scarcely receive electricity, prompting me to wonder how anyone with a cell phone was able to recharge their phones.4 The villages I spent the majority of my time in, Amritpur and Baksampur5, gave insight into the livelihoods of children in rural Bihar. In Amritpur, every corner and passageway of the village had more and more children. At times, it would seem the ratio of children to adults was ten to one. Many of these children had prominent signs of malnutrition: kwashiorkor, stunned growth, and slowly healing infections (Bhutta, Black, Cousens, & Ahmed, 2008; Som, Pal, & Bharati, 2007). One boy of about twelve, Deepak, had a nasty infection on his lower leg that continued to worsen over the week I visited. However, there was no formal doctor in the village, only someone trained in basic medical practices. He would have to go to Sitamarhi town to be given medicine, which would cost too much money for Deepak’s mother. This was a problem all too common for children of rural Bihar. School quality and attendance throughout Sitamarhi district was quite mixed. A government school I visited in Amritpur was highly understaffed, lacking proper materials and facilities, and seemed more of a social gathering point for youth. Children would sit along the walls with other classmates drawing, talking, and laughing while the teachers and administrators sat near the entrance splitting their time between socializing and supervising. When we arrived, the teachers began to complain of uneven wage scales and low salaries, providing this as a link for chaos at the school. However, another school we visited in Baksampur, which was run entirely by women, had sufficient materials, was properly staffed, and seemed to be extremely beneficial for the students. In both cases, there were noticeably tensions between attending school and working at home. Especially for older children, many would work in the mornings, helping to transplant rice, and then check into school for the second half of the day. In some cases, children would stop attending school entirely in order to help at home, such as with the case of a lower caste girl in Baksampur, Hoja.6 Pressure to earn began to outweigh the importance of schooling as the children grew older, leading to the abandonment of education in order to help the family. The livelihoods of Bihari youth were rapidly transforming, surrounded by new “modern” pursuits and desires within a rural structure and community. Lunch at an Amritpur government school Lunch Photo Credit: Khushboo Jain Tracking Agricultural Transformations Bihar’s agricultural history is extremely complex, wrapped among transforming government policy, development, and increasing mechanization of the agrarian system. Prior to the Green Revolution taking hold in Bihari agriculture, there was a structure of landholding: the Zamindar system, established under the British Raj. The system’s abolishment, however, is what I wish to focus on, in terms of the uneven effects it had on rural villages, landholdings, and landlessness. The zamindari was a system of landholding that consolidated fields in the hands of powerful village elites. For Bihar, this meant most of the land fell in the hands of upper caste Hindus (Chaudhry, 1988). Peasants were then typically tied to the land, working for the grain they produced, while remaining landless themselves. In the late 19th century, however, Bihar began to feel the effects of commercialism, beginning a process of out-migration from both the zamindar and lower class populations. In the Chapra region at the beginning of this century, upper castes had to resort to occupations other than agriculture. Rajputs, an upper caste group, went out for ‘service’ along with lower class individuals, becoming “peons and durwans in estates of larger zamindars” (de Haan 2002:120). Out-migration existed in high numbers during the zamindari system for both landowners and lower caste laborers, yet the economic gaps between landowners and lower class, as well as the frequency of migration seemed to increase after the foundation of India and the subsequent abolishment of the colonial landholding system.

Inglese

googal translate engBy Daniel A. Rosenblum 2013, Vol. 5 No. 10 | pg. 2/4 | « » Cite References Print 5 Before the Streets: Livelihoods in Rural Bihar The children of rural Bihar are connected with the rest of India unlike any other time in history. In the district town of Sitamarhi, a place that sits some twenty miles from the Nepal border, the skyline is littered with cell phone towers. On the streets below, walkways are filled with mud, trash, and cow dung. Passersby trough through the mess to buy flee-bitten mitahi (sweets) and the sweltering fruits at nearby stands. For the children of Sitamarhi, they live in this contrast—the severe juxtaposition of “modernity”3 and urbanization with the dilapidated infrastructure surrounding them. The villages within five miles of the district town scarcely receive electricity, prompting me to wonder how anyone with a cell phone was able to recharge their phones.4 The villages I spent the majority of my time in, Amritpur and Baksampur5, gave insight into the livelihoods of children in rural Bihar. In Amritpur, every corner and passageway of the village had more and more children. At times, it would seem the ratio of children to adults was ten to one. Many of these children had prominent signs of malnutrition: kwashiorkor, stunned growth, and slowly healing infections (Bhutta, Black, Cousens, & Ahmed, 2008; Som, Pal, & Bharati, 2007). One boy of about twelve, Deepak, had a nasty infection on his lower leg that continued to worsen over the week I visited. However, there was no formal doctor in the village, only someone trained in basic medical practices. He would have to go to Sitamarhi town to be given medicine, which would cost too much money for Deepak’s mother. This was a problem all too common for children of rural Bihar. School quality and attendance throughout Sitamarhi district was quite mixed. A government school I visited in Amritpur was highly understaffed, lacking proper materials and facilities, and seemed more of a social gathering point for youth. Children would sit along the walls with other classmates drawing, talking, and laughing while the teachers and administrators sat near the entrance splitting their time between socializing and supervising. When we arrived, the teachers began to complain of uneven wage scales and low salaries, providing this as a link for chaos at the school. However, another school we visited in Baksampur, which was run entirely by women, had sufficient materials, was properly staffed, and seemed to be extremely beneficial for the students. In both cases, there were noticeably tensions between attending school and working at home. Especially for older children, many would work in the mornings, helping to transplant rice, and then check into school for the second half of the day. In some cases, children would stop attending school entirely in order to help at home, such as with the case of a lower caste girl in Baksampur, Hoja.6 Pressure to earn began to outweigh the importance of schooling as the children grew older, leading to the abandonment of education in order to help the family. The livelihoods of Bihari youth were rapidly transforming, surrounded by new “modern” pursuits and desires within a rural structure and community. Lunch at an Amritpur government school Lunch Photo Credit: Khushboo Jain Tracking Agricultural Transformations Bihar’s agricultural history is extremely complex, wrapped among transforming government policy, development, and increasing mechanization of the agrarian system. Prior to the Green Revolution taking hold in Bihari agriculture, there was a structure of landholding: the Zamindar system, established under the British Raj. The system’s abolishment, however, is what I wish to focus on, in terms of the uneven effects it had on rural villages, landholdings, and landlessness. The zamindari was a system of landholding that consolidated fields in the hands of powerful village elites. For Bihar, this meant most of the land fell in the hands of upper caste Hindus (Chaudhry, 1988). Peasants were then typically tied to the land, working for the grain they produced, while remaining landless themselves. In the late 19th century, however, Bihar began to feel the effects of commercialism, beginning a process of out-migration from both the zamindar and lower class populations. In the Chapra region at the beginning of this century, upper castes had to resort to occupations other than agriculture. Rajputs, an upper caste group, went out for ‘service’ along with lower class individuals, becoming “peons and durwans in estates of larger zamindars” (de Haan 2002:120). Out-migration existed in high numbers during the zamindari system for both landowners and lower caste laborers, yet the economic gaps between landowners and lower class, as well as the frequency of migration seemed to increase after the foundation of India and the subsequent abolishment of the colonial landholding system.lish to hindi

Ultimo aggiornamento 2015-07-28
Frequenza di utilizzo: 1
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Riferimento: Anonimo
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