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Engels

unprecedented

Tagalog

mga walang uliran asa

Laatste Update: 2016-12-13
Gebruiksfrequentie: 1
Kwaliteit:

Referentie: Anoniem

Engels

unprecedented

Tagalog

Oöverträffad

Laatste Update: 2011-07-05
Gebruiksfrequentie: 1
Kwaliteit:

Referentie: Anoniem

Engels

With oil, some of us acquired unprecedented comforts.

Tagalog

Dahil sa langis, ilan sa atin nagkaroon ng kaginhawahan.

Laatste Update: 2016-10-27
Gebruiksfrequentie: 1
Kwaliteit:

Referentie: Anoniem

Engels

They produced unprecedented results on plots of land thus far ignored.

Tagalog

Nagkaroon ng di matawarang resulta sa mga pataniman na di napansin.

Laatste Update: 2016-10-27
Gebruiksfrequentie: 1
Kwaliteit:

Referentie: Anoniem

Engels

Myanmar voters celebrated in the streets while netizens on Facebook are expressing their elation over the by-election results which saw an unprecedented landslide victory for the opposition.

Tagalog

Nagdiwang sa lansangan ang maraming botante ng Myanmar habang ipinakita ng mga netizen sa Facebook ang kanilang tuwa sa ginanap na by-election na nagresulta sa isang landslide na pagkapanalo ng oposisyon.

Laatste Update: 2016-02-24
Gebruiksfrequentie: 1
Kwaliteit:

Referentie: Anoniem

Engels

The Spring Festival on January 25, 2020 has become an unprecedented and unforgettable memory to all Chinese who were urged to stay indoors for all the holiday and for many weeks after due to the outbreak of a novel viral disease.

Tagalog

Ang Pista ng Tagsibol noong Enero 25, 2020 ay naging walang katulad at hindi malilimutang alaala sa lahat ng Chinese na hinikayat na manatili sa loob ng bahay sa buong bakasyon at sa loob ng maraming linggo pagkaraan dahil sa pagkalat ng isang bagong sakit mula sa virus.

Laatste Update: 2020-08-25
Gebruiksfrequentie: 1
Kwaliteit:

Referentie: Anoniem

Engels

Climate change includes both the global warming driven by human emissions of greenhouse gases, and the resulting large-scale shifts in weather patterns.[1] Though there have been previous periods of climatic change, since the mid-20th century the rate of human impact on Earth's climate system and the global scale of that impact have been unprecedented.[2] That human activity has caused climate change is not disputed by any scientific body of national or international standing.[3] The largest driver has been the emission of greenhouse gases, of which more than 90% are carbon dioxide (CO 2) and methane.[4] Fossil fuel burning for energy consumption is the main source of these emissions, with additional contributions from agriculture, deforestation, and industrial processes.[5] Temperature rise is accelerated or tempered by climate feedbacks, such as loss of sunlight-reflecting snow and ice cover, increased water vapour (a greenhouse gas itself), and changes to land and ocean carbon sinks. Observed temperature from NASA versus the 1850–1900 average as a pre-industrial baseline. The main driver for increased global temperatures in the industrial era is human activity, with natural forces adding variability.[6] Because land surfaces heat faster than ocean surfaces, deserts are expanding and heat waves and wildfires are more common.[7] Surface temperature rise is greatest in the Arctic, where it has contributed to melting permafrost, and the retreat of glaciers and sea ice.[8] Increasing atmospheric energy and rates of evaporation cause more intense storms and weather extremes, which damage infrastructure and agriculture.[9] Rising temperatures are limiting ocean productivity and harming fish stocks in most parts of the globe.[10] Current and anticipated effects from undernutrition, heat stress and disease have led the World Health Organization to declare climate change the greatest threat to global health in the 21st century.[11] Environmental effects include the extinction or relocation of many species as their ecosystems change, most immediately in coral reefs, mountains, and the Arctic.[12] Even if efforts to minimize future warming are successful, some effects will continue for centuries, including rising sea levels, rising ocean temperatures, and ocean acidification from elevated levels of CO 2.[13] Some effects of climate change Ecological collapse possibilities. Bleaching has damaged the Great Barrier Reef and threatens reefs worldwide. Many of these effects are already observed at the current level of warming, which is about 1.1 °C (2.0 °F).[15] The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has issued a series of reports that project significant increases in these impacts as warming continues to 1.5 °C (2.7 °F) and beyond.[16] Under the Paris Agreement, nations agreed to keep warming "well under 2.0 °C (3.6 °F)" by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, under those pledges, global warming would reach about 2.8 °C (5.0 °F) by the end of the century, and current policies will result in about 3.0 °C (5.4 °F) of warming.[17] Limiting warming to 1.5 °C (2.7 °F) would require halving emissions by 2030, then reaching near-zero levels by 2050.[18] Mitigation efforts include the research, development, and deployment of low-carbon energy technologies, enhanced energy efficiency, policies to reduce fossil fuel emissions, reforestation, and forest preservation. Climate engineering techniques, most prominently solar radiation management and carbon dioxide removal, have substantial limitations and carry large uncertainties. Societies and governments are also working to adapt to current and future global-warming effects through improved coastline protection, better disaster management, and the development of more resistant crops.

Tagalog

Climate change includes both the global warming driven by human emissions of greenhouse gases, and the resulting large-scale shifts in weather patterns.[1] Though there have been previous periods of climatic change, since the mid-20th century the rate of human impact on Earth's climate system and the global scale of that impact have been unprecedented.[2] That human activity has caused climate change is not disputed by any scientific body of national or international standing.[3] The largest driver has been the emission of greenhouse gases, of which more than 90% are carbon dioxide (CO 2) and methane.[4] Fossil fuel burning for energy consumption is the main source of these emissions, with additional contributions from agriculture, deforestation, and industrial processes.[5] Temperature rise is accelerated or tempered by climate feedbacks, such as loss of sunlight-reflecting snow and ice cover, increased water vapour (a greenhouse gas itself), and changes to land and ocean carbon sinks. Observed temperature from NASA versus the 1850–1900 average as a pre-industrial baseline. The main driver for increased global temperatures in the industrial era is human activity, with natural forces adding variability.[6] Because land surfaces heat faster than ocean surfaces, deserts are expanding and heat waves and wildfires are more common.[7] Surface temperature rise is greatest in the Arctic, where it has contributed to melting permafrost, and the retreat of glaciers and sea ice.[8] Increasing atmospheric energy and rates of evaporation cause more intense storms and weather extremes, which damage infrastructure and agriculture.[9] Rising temperatures are limiting ocean productivity and harming fish stocks in most parts of the globe.[10] Current and anticipated effects from undernutrition, heat stress and disease have led the World Health Organization to declare climate change the greatest threat to global health in the 21st century.[11] Environmental effects include the extinction or relocation of many species as their ecosystems change, most immediately in coral reefs, mountains, and the Arctic.[12] Even if efforts to minimize future warming are successful, some effects will continue for centuries, including rising sea levels, rising ocean temperatures, and ocean acidification from elevated levels of CO 2.[13] Some effects of climate change Ecological collapse possibilities. Bleaching has damaged the Great Barrier Reef and threatens reefs worldwide. Many of these effects are already observed at the current level of warming, which is about 1.1 °C (2.0 °F).[15] The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has issued a series of reports that project significant increases in these impacts as warming continues to 1.5 °C (2.7 °F) and beyond.[16] Under the Paris Agreement, nations agreed to keep warming ng.[17] Limiting warming to 1.5 °C (2.7 °F) would require halving emissions by 2030, then reaching near-zero levels by 2050.[18] Mitigation efforts include the research, development, and deployment of low-carbon energy technologies, enhanced energy efficiency, policies to reduce fossil fuel emissions, reforestation, and forest preservation. Climate engineering techniques, most prominently solar radiation management and carbon dioxide removal, have substantial limitations and carry large uncertainties. Societies and governments are also working to adapt to current and future global-warming effects through improved coastline protection, better ps.

Laatste Update: 2020-11-23
Gebruiksfrequentie: 1
Kwaliteit:

Referentie: Anoniem
Waarschuwing: Bevat onzichtbare HTML-opmaak

Engels

Climate change includes both the global warming driven by human emissions of greenhouse gases, and the resulting large-scale shifts in weather patterns.[1] Though there have been previous periods of climatic change, since the mid-20th century the rate of human impact on Earth's climate system and the global scale of that impact have been unprecedented.[2] That human activity has caused climate change is not disputed by any scientific body of national or international standing.[3] The largest driver has been the emission of greenhouse gases, of which more than 90% are carbon dioxide (CO 2) and methane.[4] Fossil fuel burning for energy consumption is the main source of these emissions, with additional contributions from agriculture, deforestation, and industrial processes.[5] Temperature rise is accelerated or tempered by climate feedbacks, such as loss of sunlight-reflecting snow and ice cover, increased water vapour (a greenhouse gas itself), and changes to land and ocean carbon sinks. Observed temperature from NASA versus the 1850–1900 average as a pre-industrial baseline. The main driver for increased global temperatures in the industrial era is human activity, with natural forces adding variability.[6] Because land surfaces heat faster than ocean surfaces, deserts are expanding and heat waves and wildfires are more common.[7] Surface temperature rise is greatest in the Arctic, where it has contributed to melting permafrost, and the retreat of glaciers and sea ice.[8] Increasing atmospheric energy and rates of evaporation cause more intense storms and weather extremes, which damage infrastructure and agriculture.[9] Rising temperatures are limiting ocean productivity and harming fish stocks in most parts of the globe.[10] Current and anticipated effects from undernutrition, heat stress and disease have led the World Health Organization to declare climate change the greatest threat to global health in the 21st century.[11] Environmental effects include the extinction or relocation of many species as their ecosystems change, most immediately in coral reefs, mountains, and the Arctic.[12] Even if efforts to minimize future warming are successful, some effects will continue for centuries, including rising sea levels, rising ocean temperatures, and ocean acidification from elevated levels of CO 2.[13] Some effects of climate change Ecological collapse possibilities. Bleaching has damaged the Great Barrier Reef and threatens reefs worldwide. Many of these effects are already observed at the current level of warming, which is about 1.1 °C (2.0 °F).[15] The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has issued a series of reports that project significant increases in these impacts as warming continues to 1.5 °C (2.7 °F) and beyond.[16] Under the Paris Agreement, nations agreed to keep warming "well under 2.0 °C (3.6 °F)" by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, under those pledges, global warming would reach about 2.8 °C (5.0 °F) by the end of the century, and current policies will result in about 3.0 °C (5.4 °F) of warming.[17] Limiting warming to 1.5 °C (2.7 °F) would require halving emissions by 2030, then reaching near-zero levels by 2050.[18] Mitigation efforts include the research, development, and deployment of low-carbon energy technologies, enhanced energy efficiency, policies to reduce fossil fuel emissions, reforestation, and forest preservation. Climate engineering techniques, most prominently solar radiation management and carbon dioxide removal, have substantial limitations and carry large uncertainties. Societies and governments are also working to adapt to current and future global-warming effects through improved coastline protection, better disaster management, and the development of more resistant crops.

Tagalog

Climate change includes both the global warming driven by human emissions of greenhouse gases, and the resulting large-scale shifts in weather patterns.[1] Though there have been previous periods of climatic change, since the mid-20th century the rate of human impact on Earth's climate system and the global scale of that impact have been unprecedented.[2] That human activity has caused climate change is not disputed by any scientific body of national or international standing.[3] The largest driver has been the emission of greenhouse gases, of which more than 90% are carbon dioxide (CO 2) and methane.[4] Fossil fuel burning for energy consumption is the main source of these emissions, with additional contributions from agriculture, deforestation, and industrial processes.[5] Temperature rise is accelerated or tempered by climate feedbacks, such as loss of sunlight-reflecting snow and ice cover, increased water vapour (a greenhouse gas itself), and changes to land and ocean carbon sinks. Observed temperature from NASA versus the 1850–1900 average as a pre-industrial baseline. The main driver for increased global temperatures in the industrial era is human activity, with natural forces adding variability.[6] Because land surfaces heat faster than ocean surfaces, deserts are expanding and heat waves and wildfires are more common.[7] Surface temperature rise is greatest in the Arctic, where it has contributed to melting permafrost, and the retreat of glaciers and sea ice.[8] Increasing atmospheric energy and rates of evaporation cause more intense storms and weather extremes, which damage infrastructure and agriculture.[9] Rising temperatures are limiting ocean productivity and harming fish stocks in most parts of the globe.[10] Current and anticipated effects from undernutrition, heat stress and disease have led the World Health Organization to declare climate change the greatest threat to global health in the 21st century.[11] Environmental effects include the extinction or relocation of many species as their ecosystems change, most immediately in coral reefs, mountains, and the Arctic.[12] Even if efforts to minimize future warming are successful, some effects will continue for centuries, including rising sea levels, rising ocean temperatures, and ocean acidification from elevated levels of CO 2.[13] Some effects of climate change Ecological collapse possibilities. Bleaching has damaged the Great Barrier Reef and threatens reefs worldwide. Many of these effects are already observed at the current level of warming, which is about 1.1 °C (2.0 °F).[15] The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has issued a series of reports that project significant increases in these impacts as warming continues to 1.5 °C (2.7 °F) and beyond.[16] Under the Paris Agreement, nations agreed to keep warming "well under 2.0 °C (3.6 °F)" by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, under those pledges, global warming would reach about 2.8 °C (5.0 °F) by the end of the century, and current policies will result in about 3.0 °C (5.4 °F) of warming.[17] Limiting warming to 1.5 °C (2.7 °F) would require halving emissions by 2030, then reaching near-zero levels by 2050.[18] Mitigation efforts include the research, development, and deployment of low-carbon energy technologies, enhanced energy efficiency, policies to reduce fossil fuel emissions, reforestation, and forest preservation. Climate engineering techniques, most prominently solar radiation management and carbon dioxide removal, have substantial limitations and carry large uncertainties. Societies and governments are also working to adapt to current and future global-warming effects through improved coastline protection, better disaster management, and the development of more resistant crops.

Laatste Update: 2020-11-23
Gebruiksfrequentie: 1
Kwaliteit:

Referentie: Anoniem
Waarschuwing: Bevat onzichtbare HTML-opmaak

Engels

" According to Dr. Tom Frieden, formerly the director of the United States' Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the pandemic is ""unprecedented."" "

Tagalog

"According to Dr. Ayon kay Dr. Tom Frieden, na dating direktor ng Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ng United States, ang pandemya ay ""wala pang katulad."""

Laatste Update: 2020-08-25
Gebruiksfrequentie: 1
Kwaliteit:

Referentie: Anoniem
Waarschuwing: Bevat onzichtbare HTML-opmaak

Engels

" Coles, in its March 8 media release, reported that with the four-pack restriction in place, ""many stores are still selling out within an hour of delivery"", and called the demand ""unprecedented"", while ALDI, in a Facebook post on Tuesday, called it ""unexpected"". "

Tagalog

"Si Coles, sa inilabas ng media noong Marso 8, ay nag-ulat na sa inilagay na apat na paketeng paghihigpit, ""maraming mga tindahan ang nagbebenta pa rin sa loob ng isang oras ng paghahatid"", at tinawag ang demand na ""hindi pa nangyayari"", habang ang ALDI, sa isang post sa Facebook noong Martes, ay tinawag itong ""hindi inaasahan""."

Laatste Update: 2020-08-25
Gebruiksfrequentie: 1
Kwaliteit:

Referentie: Anoniem
Waarschuwing: Bevat onzichtbare HTML-opmaak

Engels

" On 23 January, in reaction to the central authorities' decision to implement a transportation ban in Wuhan, WHO representative Gauden Galea remarked that while it was ""certainly not a recommendation the WHO has made"", it was also ""a very important indication of the commitment to contain the epidemic in the place where it is most concentrated"" and called it ""unprecedented in public health history"".On 30 January, following confirmation of human-to-human transmission outside China and the increase in the number of cases in other countries, the WHO declared the outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC), the sixth PHEIC since the measure was first invoked during the 2009 swine flu pandemic. "

Tagalog

Noong Enero 23, bilang reaksyon sa pasya ng pangunahing awtoridad na isakatuparan ang pagbawal ng transportasyon sa Wuhan, sinabi ng kinatawan ng WHO na si Gauden Galea na habang iyon ay “siguradong hindi rekomendasyon na ginawa ng WHO”, iyon na rin ay “isang napakahalagang palatandaan ng pangako na pigilan ang epidemya sa lugar kung saan pinakamasama ito” at tinawag itong “hindi inaasahang kasaysayan ng pampublikong kalusugan”. Noong Enero 30, matapos makumpirma ang tao-sa-tao na transmisyon sa labas ng Tsina at ang pagtaas ng bilang ng mga kaso sa ibang mga bansa, idineklara ng WHO ang pagsiklab na isang Internasyonal na Alalahanin ng Publikong Emerhensya sa Kalusuganng (Public Health Emergency of International Concern, PHEIC), ang pang-anim na PHEIC mula nang unang naipanawagan ang hakbang sa panahon ng pandemyang 2009 swine flu.

Laatste Update: 2020-08-25
Gebruiksfrequentie: 1
Kwaliteit:

Referentie: Anoniem
Waarschuwing: Bevat onzichtbare HTML-opmaak

Engels

Synopsis As the foundation of the Mayan civilization begins to crumble, one man's previously idyllic existence is forever changed when he is chosen as a sacrifice needed to appease the gods in director Mel Gibson's mythic, end-times adventure. The Mayan kingdom is at the absolute height of opulence and power, but leaders are convinced that unless more temples are constructed and more human sacrifices made, the crops, and ultimately the people, will suffer. Jaguar Paw (Rudy Youngblood) is a peaceful hunter from a remote forest tribe whose life is about to be changed forever. When Jaguar Paw's village is raided and he is prepared as a sacrifice that the Mayan deities have demanded, the brave young hunter is forced to navigate a horrific new world of fear and oppression. Fearlessly determined to escape his captors and save his family from a harrowing demise, Jaguar Paw prepares to risk it all in one final, desperate attempt to preserve his dying way of life. However, few who have seen the sacrificial alter of the Mayans have managed to live to see another day. Now, in order to rescue his pregnant wife and young son, Jaguar Paw will have to elude the most powerful warriors of the Mayan kingdom while using his vast knowledge of the forest to turn the tables on those who would rather see him dead than set free. Inspired by such ancient Mayan texts as the Popul Vuh, Apocalypto marks a comprehensive collaboration between director Gibson, Cambridge-educated screenwriter Farhad Safinia, and world-renowned archeologist and Mayan culture expert Dr. Richard D. Hansen -- whose services as a special consultant on the film lent the production an unprecedented degree of historical accuracy. ~ Jason Buchanan, Rovi

Tagalog

apocalypto buod tagalog reaksyon

Laatste Update: 2015-06-30
Gebruiksfrequentie: 1
Kwaliteit:

Referentie: Anoniem

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