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Je was op zoek naar: no one can seperate them apart (Tagalog - Engels)

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Tagalog

only one i can change my life no one can do it for me

Engels

only i can change my life no one can do it for me

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Tagalog

No one ever saw me like you do

Engels

the way you look at me

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Tagalog

To talk to no one except in line of duty

Engels

11 general orders in tagalog version

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Tagalog

RIVER JUG BEING DIPPED INTO WATER DRINKING WATER PSYCHE: (REFRESHED)Ah. MENS’ FOOTSTEPS MAN 1: Thou art too pretty a maiden to be fetching water all by her lonesome self. MAN 2: Shall I do it for you? MAN 1: No, I shall complete this task! MAN 2: Who do you think is competent enough to perform this task, Psyche, me or him? PSYCHE: (STRONGWILLED) Thank you, but I am fully capable to fetch water by myself. Farewell, I must get home now. FOOTSTEPS DOOR OPENS PSYCHE: (FRUSTRATED) Father, you were right, it happened again! Men chased after me. (SIGH) KING: It is the price you must pay for your infinite beauty. NARRATOR: Recently, Venus’s temple has been abandoned. SOUND OF CRICKETS WIND SCENE TWO SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: Meanwhile at Mt. Olympus… VENUS: (STERN) Cupid, I’m so angry. Look at my temple, not a soul stands there to worship. I need you to complete a task for me. CUPID: (SOFT) Anything for you, my lovely mother. VENUS: (ANGRY) That horrible creature Psyche has stolen my admirers. All the men of the world are blind to the gods. CUPID: (HELPFUL) What do you propose we do about it? VENUS: (WICKED) I have a plan. (EVIL LAUGH) Here’s what you must do: You shall use your powers to have Psyche fall in love with most vile, despicable pig of a man. Let me show you this woman. Crystal ball, crystal ball, show me Psyche, show me all. POOF CUPID: (UNDER HIS BREATH) Gasp! Oh my, she is beautiful. I think I have been hit by one of my own arrows. VENUS: (COMMANDING) Now, be gone with you! Complete your duty! SCENE THREE SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: Instead of immediately following Venus’ commands Cupid goes to the Oracle of Apollo and asks for his help. KNOCKING DOOR OPENING CUPID: (PLEADING) I need your help! ORACLE: (HAPPY) How may I be of your assistance? CUPID: (WORRIED) My mother has ordered me to make Psyche fall in love with a hideous man, but instead I, myself, have fallen in love with her. What shall I do? ORACLE: I will come up with a plan. KNOCKING ORACLE: Hold on a minute. FOOTSTEPS DOOR OPENING ORACLE: (WELCOMING) Well, hello, King. CUPID: (UNDER HIS BREATH) Oh no! I must not be seen! WINGS FLAPPING ORACLE: So my dear King, how may I be of assistance? KING: (STERN) I must find my daughter, Psyche, a good husband. ORACLE: Well…in order for her to find a her destined husband, she must be dressed in the deepest mourning, must be set on the summit of a rocky hill alone, and there, her destined husband, a fearful winged serpent, stronger than the gods themselves, will come to her and make her his wife. KING: (SAD) What has my daughter done to deserve this treachery? SCENE FOUR SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: On top of a rocky hill in the darkness, Psyche awaits her destined husband. WOMAN CRYING STRONG WIND PSYCHE: (SURPRISED) Oh my I’m being uplifted by Zephyr. WOMAN BEING PLOPPED ONTO GROUND PSYCHE: What a beautiful meadow I landed in. Thank you Zephyr, sweetest of winds, for taking me to this peaceful meadow. (YAWNS) NARRATOR: And with that, all of Psyche’s troubles left her. She fell sound asleep. SCENE FIVE SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: Soon after, Psyche awoke aside a bright river. On the bank was built a beautiful palace. PSYCHE: (PONDERING) Goodness! What a splendid mansion, but it seems like no one is home. Cupid 2 VOICE 1: (MYSTERIOUS VOICE) This wonderful home is all yours. VOICE 2: MYSTERIOUS VOICE) Do not be afraid. Enter the house and bathe. VOICE 1: A banquet table will be spread for you. VOICE 2: We are your servants, here to do as you desire. NARRATOR: The rest of Psyche’s joyful day included a delightful bath, the most delicious food, and listening to a beautiful choir. At night, Psyche finds herself in the presence of her lover, but does not know his identity due to the darkness. PSYCHE: (QUESTIONABLY) Hello? Who’s there? CUPID: (DEEP, COMFORTING VOICE) Its ok, my dear. Have no fear; I am not the monster you think I am. PSYCHE: (UNDER HER BREATH) Wow, he seems quite kind. CUPID: I will always be here for you. SCENE SIX SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: After many days of happiness at the palace, Psyche longed to see her sisters at the rock hill where she had been picked up by Zephyr, but her lover would not allow it. PSYCHE: (PLEADING) My love, I wish to go talk to my sisters. CUPID: (STERN) I do not advise this; it will lead to your own destruction. PSYCHE: But I yearn for their presence! Do not cause me such pain! CUPID: If you really must, go along. PSYCHE: (OVERJOYED) Thank you so much! NARRATOR: The next day, Psyche walks to the top of the hill to meet her sisters. PSYCHE: (HAPPY) Hello dear sisters! I have missed you so! SISTER 1: How nice to see you Psyche! How is your marriage? PSYCHE: Oh, it’s fine. My husband is currently away on a hunting trip, but come with me to my new home. FOOTSTEPS SISTER 2: Wow, your mansion is beautiful! PSYCHE: Yes, now come see the marvelous inside! NARRATOR: Psyche toured her sisters around the house. After each wonder showed to them, the sisters envied her more and more. PSYCHE: And in this room, we store all of our jewels. I have a small gift for you. SISTER 2: (AMAZED) Oh my! That is the most beautiful necklace I’ve ever seen! NARRATOR: It had become late, so Psyche’s sisters decided to depart from the mansion. Psyche waved farewell, and her sisters walked home. During their walk, they decided they must plot revenge on their sister due to their jealousy. PSYCHE: Cupid, I had such a wonderful time with my sisters, and now I long to see them again! CUPID: Again, I do not advise this, but if you really want to, go ahead. NARRATOR: The next day, the sisters meet up with Psyche once more with the intent to pursue their plan. SISTER 1: How nice to see you again Psyche! PSYCHE: Nice to see you too, my dear sisters! SISTER 2: (SLYLY) Your palace is lovely and all, but what does your husband look like? We have never seen him before. PSYCHE: Um…well… SISTER 1: You don’t know? PSYCHE: Oh, sisters, to tell you the truth, I have never seen his face, but he seems like a great gentleman. SISTER 2: He’s probably is a despicable monster! PSYCHE: No, no, no, you’re getting things all wrong! He is kind. SISTER 1: No, he must be the fearful serpent Apollo declared him to be. PSYCHE: (PANICKING) Oh my, sisters! He might be! SISTER 2: Yes, he is! You must do something about it! SISTER 1: We have some advice for you. Here is what you must do: Before you go to sleep, hide a sharp knife and a lamp under your bed. When your husband is sound asleep, light the lamp, get the knife, and plunge it into the body of the fearful monster you lay your eyes on. NARRATOR: Her two sisters left and Psyche sadly prepared the murder of her husband. That night, once her husband was fast asleep, Psyche lit the lamp, grabbed the light, and set out to complete her task. PSYCHE: (GASP) My, he is so handsome! He is not a monster, but instead the lovely God of Love, Cupid! DRIPPING OIL SIZZLING ON SKIN CUPID: (SAD) OW! Psyche! I am so disappointed in you. You did not trust me. There is no love. WING FLAPPING PSYCHE: (DISAPOINTED WITH HERSELF) How stupid am I? My husband was the most handsome man alive and now he is gone. I will not rest until I find him once more. SCENE SEVEN MUSIC “ONE”: SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: Cupid, injured, flies to Venus for his mother’s help. He tells her the whole story of how he came to fall in love with Psyche. VENUS: Cupid, you have disappointed me. I will go find this woman to show her what happens when you draw down the displeasure of a goddess. CUPID: (INJURED) She has injured me, but I still love her greatly. VENUS: I have a good plan. You’ll see what I’ll do. NARRATOR: Psyche, hopeless decides to go to Venus, and offer herself as a servant. She hopes to reconcile with Cupid. PSYCHE: Venus, I have come here to offer myself as a servant for you to make up for my wrong doings. VENUS: (CACKLES) You think that I would let you be my servant? PSYCHE: (PLEADING) Please let me right this wrong. VENUS: I will show my good will by training you by giving you various tasks. NARRATOR: Psyche is ordered to do two difficult tasks, but the creatures take pity on her and aid her, allowing her to complete each of them. PSYCHE: (PROUD) I have finished the tasks you have given me. VENUS: (ANNOYED) How did you complete them so fast? Well, never mind, here is another: This is a box. I need you to fill it will some of Persephone’s beauty. She lives in the underworld. PSYCHE: (UNDER HER BREATH) This is the hardest task yet. How can I complete it? NARRATOR: As Psyche walks on the road to Hades, a friendly guide offers her directions. GUIDE: (FUNNY ACCENT) Hello, Hello. Okay, um, first you must go to a great hole in the earth, then you must go down the river of Death, then you must give the ferryman, Charon, a penny to give you a ride across the river. After that, there is a road that leads straight to the palace. You will meet a very, very, big dog, Cerebus, he is very big, but if you give him a cake he will be very friendly and let you pass. NARRATOR: Psyche follows his instructions and completes the task. After a short amount of time, Psyche comes back from the underworld. PSYCHE: I wonder what is in this box. CREAKING STRONG WIND PSYCHE: (YAWNS) I’m so tired… WINGS FLAPPING UPID: (QUIETLY) Oh, she’s sound asleep. I must

Engels

RIVER JUG BEING DIPPED INTO WATER DRINKING WATER PSYCHE: (REFRESHED)Ah. MENS’ FOOTSTEPS MAN 1: Thou art too pretty a maiden to be fetching water all by her lonesome self. MAN 2: Shall I do it for you? MAN 1: No, I shall complete this task! MAN 2: Who do you think is competent enough to perform this task, Psyche, me or him? PSYCHE: (STRONGWILLED) Thank you, but I am fully capable to fetch water by myself. Farewell, I must get home now. FOOTSTEPS DOOR OPENS PSYCHE: (FRUSTRATED) Father, you were right, it happened again! Men chased after me. (SIGH) KING: It is the price you must pay for your infinite beauty. NARRATOR: Recently, Venus’s temple has been abandoned. SOUND OF CRICKETS WIND SCENE TWO SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: Meanwhile at Mt. Olympus… VENUS: (STERN) Cupid, I’m so angry. Look at my temple, not a soul stands there to worship. I need you to complete a task for me. CUPID: (SOFT) Anything for you, my lovely mother. VENUS: (ANGRY) That horrible creature Psyche has stolen my admirers. All the men of the world are blind to the gods. CUPID: (HELPFUL) What do you propose we do about it? VENUS: (WICKED) I have a plan. (EVIL LAUGH) Here’s what you must do: You shall use your powers to have Psyche fall in love with most vile, despicable pig of a man. Let me show you this woman. Crystal ball, crystal ball, show me Psyche, show me all. POOF CUPID: (UNDER HIS BREATH) Gasp! Oh my, she is beautiful. I think I have been hit by one of my own arrows. VENUS: (COMMANDING) Now, be gone with you! Complete your duty! SCENE THREE SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: Instead of immediately following Venus’ commands Cupid goes to the Oracle of Apollo and asks for his help. KNOCKING DOOR OPENING CUPID: (PLEADING) I need your help! ORACLE: (HAPPY) How may I be of your assistance? CUPID: (WORRIED) My mother has ordered me to make Psyche fall in love with a hideous man, but instead I, myself, have fallen in love with her. What shall I do? ORACLE: I will come up with a plan. KNOCKING ORACLE: Hold on a minute. FOOTSTEPS DOOR OPENING ORACLE: (WELCOMING) Well, hello, King. CUPID: (UNDER HIS BREATH) Oh no! I must not be seen! WINGS FLAPPING ORACLE: So my dear King, how may I be of assistance? KING: (STERN) I must find my daughter, Psyche, a good husband. ORACLE: Well…in order for her to find a her destined husband, she must be dressed in the deepest mourning, must be set on the summit of a rocky hill alone, and there, her destined husband, a fearful winged serpent, stronger than the gods themselves, will come to her and make her his wife. KING: (SAD) What has my daughter done to deserve this treachery? SCENE FOUR SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: On top of a rocky hill in the darkness, Psyche awaits her destined husband. WOMAN CRYING STRONG WIND PSYCHE: (SURPRISED) Oh my I’m being uplifted by Zephyr. WOMAN BEING PLOPPED ONTO GROUND PSYCHE: What a beautiful meadow I landed in. Thank you Zephyr, sweetest of winds, for taking me to this peaceful meadow. (YAWNS) NARRATOR: And with that, all of Psyche’s troubles left her. She fell sound asleep. SCENE FIVE SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: Soon after, Psyche awoke aside a bright river. On the bank was built a beautiful palace. PSYCHE: (PONDERING) Goodness! What a splendid mansion, but it seems like no one is home. Cupid 2 VOICE 1: (MYSTERIOUS VOICE) This wonderful home is all yours. VOICE 2: MYSTERIOUS VOICE) Do not be afraid. Enter the house and bathe. VOICE 1: A banquet table will be spread for you. VOICE 2: We are your servants, here to do as you desire. NARRATOR: The rest of Psyche’s joyful day included a delightful bath, the most delicious food, and listening to a beautiful choir. At night, Psyche finds herself in the presence of her lover, but does not know his identity due to the darkness. PSYCHE: (QUESTIONABLY) Hello? Who’s there? CUPID: (DEEP, COMFORTING VOICE) Its ok, my dear. Have no fear; I am not the monster you think I am. PSYCHE: (UNDER HER BREATH) Wow, he seems quite kind. CUPID: I will always be here for you. SCENE SIX SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: After many days of happiness at the palace, Psyche longed to see her sisters at the rock hill where she had been picked up by Zephyr, but her lover would not allow it. PSYCHE: (PLEADING) My love, I wish to go talk to my sisters. CUPID: (STERN) I do not advise this; it will lead to your own destruction. PSYCHE: But I yearn for their presence! Do not cause me such pain! CUPID: If you really must, go along. PSYCHE: (OVERJOYED) Thank you so much! NARRATOR: The next day, Psyche walks to the top of the hill to meet her sisters. PSYCHE: (HAPPY) Hello dear sisters! I have missed you so! SISTER 1: How nice to see you Psyche! How is your marriage? PSYCHE: Oh, it’s fine. My husband is currently away on a hunting trip, but come with me to my new home. FOOTSTEPS SISTER 2: Wow, your mansion is beautiful! PSYCHE: Yes, now come see the marvelous inside! NARRATOR: Psyche toured her sisters around the house. After each wonder showed to them, the sisters envied her more and more. PSYCHE: And in this room, we store all of our jewels. I have a small gift for you. SISTER 2: (AMAZED) Oh my! That is the most beautiful necklace I’ve ever seen! NARRATOR: It had become late, so Psyche’s sisters decided to depart from the mansion. Psyche waved farewell, and her sisters walked home. During their walk, they decided they must plot revenge on their sister due to their jealousy. PSYCHE: Cupid, I had such a wonderful time with my sisters, and now I long to see them again! CUPID: Again, I do not advise this, but if you really want to, go ahead. NARRATOR: The next day, the sisters meet up with Psyche once more with the intent to pursue their plan. SISTER 1: How nice to see you again Psyche! PSYCHE: Nice to see you too, my dear sisters! SISTER 2: (SLYLY) Your palace is lovely and all, but what does your husband look like? We have never seen him before. PSYCHE: Um…well… SISTER 1: You don’t know? PSYCHE: Oh, sisters, to tell you the truth, I have never seen his face, but he seems like a great gentleman. SISTER 2: He’s probably is a despicable monster! PSYCHE: No, no, no, you’re getting things all wrong! He is kind. SISTER 1: No, he must be the fearful serpent Apollo declared him to be. PSYCHE: (PANICKING) Oh my, sisters! He might be! SISTER 2: Yes, he is! You must do something about it! SISTER 1: We have some advice for you. Here is what you must do: Before you go to sleep, hide a sharp knife and a lamp under your bed. When your husband is sound asleep, light the lamp, get the knife, and plunge it into the body of the fearful monster you lay your eyes on. NARRATOR: Her two sisters left and Psyche sadly prepared the murder of her husband. That night, once her husband was fast asleep, Psyche lit the lamp, grabbed the light, and set out to complete her task. PSYCHE: (GASP) My, he is so handsome! He is not a monster, but instead the lovely God of Love, Cupid! DRIPPING OIL SIZZLING ON SKIN CUPID: (SAD) OW! Psyche! I am so disappointed in you. You did not trust me. There is no love. WING FLAPPING PSYCHE: (DISAPOINTED WITH HERSELF) How stupid am I? My husband was the most handsome man alive and now he is gone. I will not rest until I find him once more. SCENE SEVEN MUSIC “ONE”: SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: Cupid, injured, flies to Venus for his mother’s help. He tells her the whole story of how he came to fall in love with Psyche. VENUS: Cupid, you have disappointed me. I will go find this woman to show her what happens when you draw down the displeasure of a goddess. CUPID: (INJURED) She has injured me, but I still love her greatly. VENUS: I have a good plan. You’ll see what I’ll do. NARRATOR: Psyche, hopeless decides to go to Venus, and offer herself as a servant. She hopes to reconcile with Cupid. PSYCHE: Venus, I have come here to offer myself as a servant for you to make up for my wrong doings. VENUS: (CACKLES) You think that I would let you be my servant? PSYCHE: (PLEADING) Please let me right this wrong. VENUS: I will show my good will by training you by giving you various tasks. NARRATOR: Psyche is ordered to do two difficult tasks, but the creatures take pity on her and aid her, allowing her to complete each of them. PSYCHE: (PROUD) I have finished the tasks you have given me. VENUS: (ANNOYED) How did you complete them so fast? Well, never mind, here is another: This is a box. I need you to fill it will some of Persephone’s beauty. She lives in the underworld. PSYCHE: (UNDER HER BREATH) This is the hardest task yet. How can I complete it? NARRATOR: As Psyche walks on the road to Hades, a friendly guide offers her directions. GUIDE: (FUNNY ACCENT) Hello, Hello. Okay, um, first you must go to a great hole in the earth, then you must go down the river of Death, then you must give the ferryman, Charon, a penny to give you a ride across the river. After that, there is a road that leads straight to the palace. You will meet a very, very, big dog, Cerebus, he is very big, but if you give him a cake he will be very friendly and let you pass. NARRATOR: Psyche follows his instructions and completes the task. After a short amount of time, Psyche comes back from the underworld. PSYCHE: I wonder what is in this box. CREAKING STRONG WIND PSYCHE: (YAWNS) I’m so tired… WINGS FLAPPING CUPID: (QUIETLY) Oh, she’s sound asleep. I must poke her with one of my arrows. PSYCHE: (YAWNS) (SUPIRSED) Cupid! CUPID: Oh Psyche, you are too curious for your own good. (DESPERATELY) These past few days, I have missed you so. I cannot live without you. PSYCHE: I feel the same way, Cupid. I love you.

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Tagalog

characteristicsSophocles was an ancient Greek poet and one of three ancient Greek tragedians whose plays have survived. His plays belonged to the period after Aeschylus and earlier of Euripides. Based on the information provided by Suda, a 10th century encyclopedia, Sophocles wrote 123 plays during his lifetime, out of which only seven have survived in a complete form. These plays are Ajax, Antigone, Trachinian Women, Oedipus the King, Electra, Philoctetes and Oedipus at Colonus. It was believed that he remained the most celebrated playwright in the dramatic competitions of the city-state of Athens held during the religious festivals of the Lenaea and the Dionysia. Sophocles participated in thirty competitions, of which he won 24 and never went below second place in the rest. Among his plays, the two most famous tragedies, Oedipus and Antigone are generally known as the Theban plays, even though each play belonged to a part of a different tetralogy. Sophocles greatly influenced the drama. His main contribution was the addition of third actor which reduced the importance of the chorus in the presentation of the plot. A crater on the surface of Mercury has been after this ace Greek poet and playwright. Sophocles Childhood and Life Sophocles was the son of Sophilus, who was a rich member of the rural deme (small community) of Colonus Hippius. Sophocles was said to have been born in Attica. It is said that he was born few years before the Battle of Marathon in 490 BC, which is probably around 497/6 BC. Sophocles received his first artistic achievement in 468 BC, when he won first prize in the Dionysia theatre competition over the reigning master of Athenian drama, Aeschylus. According to Greek historian Plutarch, this victory was quite unusual. Unlike the usual custom of choosing judges by lot, the archon asked Cimon and the other strategoi present to decide the victor of the contest. According to him after being defeated, Aeschylus left for Sicily. “Triptolemus” was one amongst the plays that Sophocles presented at this festival. When Sophocles was sixteen, he was chosen to lead the paean, a choral chant to a God, celebrating the Greek victory over the Persians at the Battle of Salamis. He was one of the ten strategoi, high executive officials that commanded the armed forces and was the junior colleague of Pericles. In the beginning of his career, Sophocles received patronage from the politician Cimon. Even when Cimon was ostracized by Pericles (Cimon's rival) in 461 BC, Sophocles received no harm. In 443/ 442 he became one of the Hellenotamiai, or treasurers of Athena, and had the role to assist managing the finances of the city during the political ascendancy of Pericles. Based on the accounts of the Vita Sophoclis, he served as a general in the Athenian campaign against Samos in 441 BC. It was believed that Sophocles received this post because of his writing of Antigone. In 420 BC, when Asclepius was introduced to Athens, he welcomed it and set up an altar for the image of deity at his house. In 413, Sophocles was elected one of the commissioners who reacted to the catastrophic destruction of the Athenian expeditionary force in Sicily during the Peloponnesian War. Personal Life Sophocles first married to Nicostrata, with whom he had a son named Iophon. In the later life, he had relationship with a woman of Sicyon. She bore him a son called Ariston. It was believed that he had three more sons, but there is not much information about them. Death In the winter of 406/ 405 BC, Sophocles died at the age of ninety or ninety one. Like the other famous men from the ancient history, his death also inspired many apocryphal stories. One of the stories states that he died from the strain of trying to recite a long sentence from his play, “Antigone” without pausing to take a breath. Whereas the other story suggests that he choked to death while eating grapes at the Anthesteria festival in Athens. The third story accounts that he died due to excessive happiness over winning his final victory at the City Dionysia. Works The earliest contribution of Sophocles to the drama was the introduction of the third actor which immensely reduced the role of the chorus and created better opportunities for character development and conflict between characters. Even his competitor Aeschylus, who dominated Athenian playwrights during Sophocles' early career, accepted the new idea and adopted it into his own work towards the end of his life. Aristotle gave Sophocles the credit of the introduction of skenographia, or scenery-painting. After the death of Aeschylus in 456 BC, Sophocles became the celebrated playwright in Athens. He emerged victorious in different dramatic competitions, 18 at Dionysia and 6 at Lenaea festivals. Apart from making innovations in the dramatic structure, he was also known for his deeper development of characters than the earlier playwrights. His widespread reputation helped him to get invitation from foreign rulers to attend their courts, but unlike other playwrights Aeschylus who died in Sicily, or Euripides who spent time in Macedon, he never accepted any of these invitations. Sophocles works were influential and significant for the Greek culture. Two out of his seven plays can be estimated correctly to their exact dates, which namely are “Philoctetes” (409 BC) and “Oedipus at Colonus” (401 BC, staged after his death by his grandson). From the rest of his plays, “Electra” had striking similarities to these two plays which put forwards the fact that it was written in the later part of his literary career. Again based on the stylistic characteristics of “Oedipus the King” which came in his middle period, “Ajax”, “Antigone” and “The Trachiniae” belonged to his early days. Sophocles had also written three Theban plays namely, “Oedipus the King”, “Oedipus at Colonus” and “Antigone”. All these plays described the fate of Thebes during and after the reign of King Oedipus. These plays were sometimes even published under a single cover. Sophocles had written these plays in separate festival competitions with several years of difference between them. They cannot be called trilogy because of the presence of inconsistencies among them. Apart from these, Sophocles is supposed to have written few more Theban plays such as such as “The Progeny”, which survived in fragments. The majority of his plays depicted the undercurrent of early fatalism and the offset of Socratic logic being the keystone for the long tradition of Greek tragedy.

Engels

Sophocles was an ancient Greek poet and one of three ancient Greek tragedians whose plays have survived. His plays belonged to the period after Aeschylus and earlier of Euripides. Based on the information provided by Suda, a 10th century encyclopedia, Sophocles wrote 123 plays during his lifetime, out of which only seven have survived in a complete form. These plays are Ajax, Antigone, Trachinian Women, Oedipus the King, Electra, Philoctetes and Oedipus at Colonus. It was believed that he remained the most celebrated playwright in the dramatic competitions of the city-state of Athens held during the religious festivals of the Lenaea and the Dionysia. Sophocles participated in thirty competitions, of which he won 24 and never went below second place in the rest. Among his plays, the two most famous tragedies, Oedipus and Antigone are generally known as the Theban plays, even though each play belonged to a part of a different tetralogy. Sophocles greatly influenced the drama. His main contribution was the addition of third actor which reduced the importance of the chorus in the presentation of the plot. A crater on the surface of Mercury has been after this ace Greek poet and playwright. Sophocles Childhood and Life Sophocles was the son of Sophilus, who was a rich member of the rural deme (small community) of Colonus Hippius. Sophocles was said to have been born in Attica. It is said that he was born few years before the Battle of Marathon in 490 BC, which is probably around 497/6 BC. Sophocles received his first artistic achievement in 468 BC, when he won first prize in the Dionysia theatre competition over the reigning master of Athenian drama, Aeschylus. According to Greek historian Plutarch, this victory was quite unusual. Unlike the usual custom of choosing judges by lot, the archon asked Cimon and the other strategoi present to decide the victor of the contest. According to him after being defeated, Aeschylus left for Sicily. “Triptolemus” was one amongst the plays that Sophocles presented at this festival. When Sophocles was sixteen, he was chosen to lead the paean, a choral chant to a God, celebrating the Greek victory over the Persians at the Battle of Salamis. He was one of the ten strategoi, high executive officials that commanded the armed forces and was the junior colleague of Pericles. In the beginning of his career, Sophocles received patronage from the politician Cimon. Even when Cimon was ostracized by Pericles (Cimon's rival) in 461 BC, Sophocles received no harm. In 443/ 442 he became one of the Hellenotamiai, or treasurers of Athena, and had the role to assist managing the finances of the city during the political ascendancy of Pericles. Based on the accounts of the Vita Sophoclis, he served as a general in the Athenian campaign against Samos in 441 BC. It was believed that Sophocles received this post because of his writing of Antigone. In 420 BC, when Asclepius was introduced to Athens, he welcomed it and set up an altar for the image of deity at his house. In 413, Sophocles was elected one of the commissioners who reacted to the catastrophic destruction of the Athenian expeditionary force in Sicily during the Peloponnesian War. Personal Life Sophocles first married to Nicostrata, with whom he had a son named Iophon. In the later life, he had relationship with a woman of Sicyon. She bore him a son called Ariston. It was believed that he had three more sons, but there is not much information about them. Death In the winter of 406/ 405 BC, Sophocles died at the age of ninety or ninety one. Like the other famous men from the ancient history, his death also inspired many apocryphal stories. One of the stories states that he died from the strain of trying to recite a long sentence from his play, “Antigone” without pausing to take a breath. Whereas the other story suggests that he choked to death while eating grapes at the Anthesteria festival in Athens. The third story accounts that he died due to excessive happiness over winning his final victory at the City Dionysia. Works The earliest contribution of Sophocles to the drama was the introduction of the third actor which immensely reduced the role of the chorus and created better opportunities for character development and conflict between characters. Even his competitor Aeschylus, who dominated Athenian playwrights during Sophocles' early career, accepted the new idea and adopted it into his own work towards the end of his life. Aristotle gave Sophocles the credit of the introduction of skenographia, or scenery-painting. After the death of Aeschylus in 456 BC, Sophocles became the celebrated playwright in Athens. He emerged victorious in different dramatic competitions, 18 at Dionysia and 6 at Lenaea festivals. Apart from making innovations in the dramatic structure, he was also known for his deeper development of characters than the earlier playwrights. His widespread reputation helped him to get invitation from foreign rulers to attend their courts, but unlike other playwrights Aeschylus who died in Sicily, or Euripides who spent time in Macedon, he never accepted any of these invitations. Sophocles works were influential and significant for the Greek culture. Two out of his seven plays can be estimated correctly to their exact dates, which namely are “Philoctetes” (409 BC) and “Oedipus at Colonus” (401 BC, staged after his death by his grandson). From the rest of his plays, “Electra” had striking similarities to these two plays which put forwards the fact that it was written in the later part of his literary career. Again based on the stylistic characteristics of “Oedipus the King” which came in his middle period, “Ajax”, “Antigone” and “The Trachiniae” belonged to his early days. Sophocles had also written three Theban plays namely, “Oedipus the King”, “Oedipus at Colonus” and “Antigone”. All these plays described the fate of Thebes during and after the reign of King Oedipus. These plays were sometimes even published under a single cover. Sophocles had written these plays in separate festival competitions with several years of difference between them. They cannot be called trilogy because of the presence of inconsistencies among them. Apart from these, Sophocles is supposed to have written few more Theban plays such as such as “The Progeny”, which survived in fragments. The majority of his plays depicted the undercurrent of early fatalism and the offset of Socratic logic being the keystone for the long tradition of Greek tragedy.

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1. To take charge of the post and all company property in view and protect/preserve the same utmost diligence. 2. To walk in an alert manner during my tour of duty and observe everything within sight or hearing. 3. To report all violations of regulations or orders i am instructed to enforce. 4. To relay all calls from more distant from the guard house where i am stationed. 5. To quit my post only when properly relieved. 6. To receive, obey and pass to the relieving guard all orders from the company officials, officers in the agency, supervisor, post in charge of shift leaders. 7. To talk to no one except in the line of duty. 8. To make sound or call the alarm in case of fire or disorder 9. To call the superior officer in any case not covered by the instructions. 10. To salute all company officials, officers of the agency, ranking public officials and officers of the AFP and PNP. 11. To be especially watchful at night, and, during the time for challenging, to challenge all persons on or near my post and to allow no one to pass without proper authority.

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Sophocles was an ancient Greek poet and one of three ancient Greek tragedians whose plays have survived. His plays belonged to the period after Aeschylus and earlier of Euripides. Based on the information provided by Suda, a 10th century encyclopedia, Sophocles wrote 123 plays during his lifetime, out of which only seven have survived in a complete form. These plays are Ajax, Antigone, Trachinian Women, Oedipus the King, Electra, Philoctetes and Oedipus at Colonus. It was believed that he remained the most celebrated playwright in the dramatic competitions of the city-state of Athens held during the religious festivals of the Lenaea and the Dionysia. Sophocles participated in thirty competitions, of which he won 24 and never went below second place in the rest. Among his plays, the two most famous tragedies, Oedipus and Antigone are generally known as the Theban plays, even though each play belonged to a part of a different tetralogy. Sophocles greatly influenced the drama. His main contribution was the addition of third actor which reduced the importance of the chorus in the presentation of the plot. A crater on the surface of Mercury has been after this ace Greek poet and playwright. Sophocles Childhood and Life Sophocles was the son of Sophilus, who was a rich member of the rural deme (small community) of Colonus Hippius. Sophocles was said to have been born in Attica. It is said that he was born few years before the Battle of Marathon in 490 BC, which is probably around 497/6 BC. Sophocles received his first artistic achievement in 468 BC, when he won first prize in the Dionysia theatre competition over the reigning master of Athenian drama, Aeschylus. According to Greek historian Plutarch, this victory was quite unusual. Unlike the usual custom of choosing judges by lot, the archon asked Cimon and the other strategoi present to decide the victor of the contest. According to him after being defeated, Aeschylus left for Sicily. “Triptolemus” was one amongst the plays that Sophocles presented at this festival. When Sophocles was sixteen, he was chosen to lead the paean, a choral chant to a God, celebrating the Greek victory over the Persians at the Battle of Salamis. He was one of the ten strategoi, high executive officials that commanded the armed forces and was the junior colleague of Pericles. In the beginning of his career, Sophocles received patronage from the politician Cimon. Even when Cimon was ostracized by Pericles (Cimon's rival) in 461 BC, Sophocles received no harm. In 443/ 442 he became one of the Hellenotamiai, or treasurers of Athena, and had the role to assist managing the finances of the city during the political ascendancy of Pericles. Based on the accounts of the Vita Sophoclis, he served as a general in the Athenian campaign against Samos in 441 BC. It was believed that Sophocles received this post because of his writing of Antigone. In 420 BC, when Asclepius was introduced to Athens, he welcomed it and set up an altar for the image of deity at his house. In 413, Sophocles was elected one of the commissioners who reacted to the catastrophic destruction of the Athenian expeditionary force in Sicily during the Peloponnesian War. Personal Life Sophocles first married to Nicostrata, with whom he had a son named Iophon. In the later life, he had relationship with a woman of Sicyon. She bore him a son called Ariston. It was believed that he had three more sons, but there is not much information about them. Death In the winter of 406/ 405 BC, Sophocles died at the age of ninety or ninety one. Like the other famous men from the ancient history, his death also inspired many apocryphal stories. One of the stories states that he died from the strain of trying to recite a long sentence from his play, “Antigone” without pausing to take a breath. Whereas the other story suggests that he choked to death while eating grapes at the Anthesteria festival in Athens. The third story accounts that he died due to excessive happiness over winning his final victory at the City Dionysia. Works The earliest contribution of Sophocles to the drama was the introduction of the third actor which immensely reduced the role of the chorus and created better opportunities for character development and conflict between characters. Even his competitor Aeschylus, who dominated Athenian playwrights during Sophocles' early career, accepted the new idea and adopted it into his own work towards the end of his life. Aristotle gave Sophocles the credit of the introduction of skenographia, or scenery-painting. After the death of Aeschylus in 456 BC, Sophocles became the celebrated playwright in Athens. He emerged victorious in different dramatic competitions, 18 at Dionysia and 6 at Lenaea festivals. Apart from making innovations in the dramatic structure, he was also known for his deeper development of characters than the earlier playwrights. His widespread reputation helped him to get invitation from foreign rulers to attend their courts, but unlike other playwrights Aeschylus who died in Sicily, or Euripides who spent time in Macedon, he never accepted any of these invitations. Sophocles works were influential and significant for the Greek culture. Two out of his seven plays can be estimated correctly to their exact dates, which namely are “Philoctetes” (409 BC) and “Oedipus at Colonus” (401 BC, staged after his death by his grandson). From the rest of his plays, “Electra” had striking similarities to these two plays which put forwards the fact that it was written in the later part of his literary career. Again based on the stylistic characteristics of “Oedipus the King” which came in his middle period, “Ajax”, “Antigone” and “The Trachiniae” belonged to his early days. Sophocles had also written three Theban plays namely, “Oedipus the King”, “Oedipus at Colonus” and “Antigone”. All these plays described the fate of Thebes during and after the reign of King Oedipus. These plays were sometimes even published under a single cover. Sophocles had written these plays in separate festival competitions with several years of difference between them. They cannot be called trilogy because of the presence of inconsistencies among them. Apart from these, Sophocles is supposed to have written few more Theban plays such as such as “The Progeny”, which survived in fragments. The majority of his plays depicted the undercurrent of early fatalism and the offset of Socratic logic being the keystone for the long tradition of Greek tragedy.

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sophocles

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type full sentenIf sometimes we found ourselves keeping both pride for something that we really feel us heavy'arguing for some matter that we can't definitely win.due to it' we made decisions that really against to what our hearts want' however. No matter how hard and how rough we will be went through this feeling will never be change. ILOVEYOU than no one ce in your langage

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If sometimes we found ourselves keeping both pride for something that we really feel us heavy'arguing for some matter that we can't definitely win.due to it' we made decisions that really against to what our hearts want' however. No matter how hard and how rough we will be went through this feeling will never be change. ILOVEYOU than no one

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