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Английский

flew

Тагальский

lumipad

Последнее обновление: 2018-06-07
Частота использования: 1
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Источник: Анонимно

Английский

already flew

Тагальский

flew

Последнее обновление: 2016-06-14
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Источник: Анонимно

Английский

the bird flew to the nest in the wood

Тагальский

lumipad ang ibon sa pugad sa kahoy upang ilagay ang pag kai kanyang nakuha

Последнее обновление: 2020-02-27
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Источник: Анонимно

Английский

The birds flew south in search of warmth.

Тагальский

Ang mga ibon ay lumipad patimog sa paghahanap ng mainit na lugar.

Последнее обновление: 2014-02-01
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Источник: Анонимно

Английский

alice in wonderland tagalog veOnce upon a time . . . there lived a woman who had no children. She dreamed of having a little girl, but time went by, and her dream never came true. She then went to visit a witch, who gave her a magic grain of barley. She planted it in a flower pot. And the very next day, the grain had turned into a lovely flower, rather like a tulip. The woman softly kissed its half-shut petals. And as though by magic, the flower opened in full blossom. Inside sat a tiny girl, no bigger than a thumb. The woman called her Thumbelina. For a bed she had a walnut shell, violet petals for her mattress and a rose petal blanket. In the daytime, she played in a tulip petal boat, floating on a plate of water. Using two horse hairs as oars, Thumbelina sailed around her little lake, singing and singing in a gentle sweet voice. Then one night, as she lay fast asleep in her walnut shell, a large frog hopped through a hole in the window pane. As she gazed down at Thumbelina, she said to herself: "How pretty she is! She'd make the perfect bride for my own dear son!" She picked up Thumbelina, walnut shell and all, and hopped into the garden. Nobody saw her go.Back at the pond, her fat ugly son, who always did as mother told him, was pleased with her choice. But mother frog was afraid that her pretty prisoner might run away. So she carried Thumbellna out to a water lily leaf ln the middle of the pond. "She can never escape us now," said the frog to her son. "And we have plenty of time to prepare a new home for you and your bride." Thumbelina was left all alone. She felt so desperate. She knew she would never be able to escape the fate that awaited her with the two horrid fat frogs. All she could do was cry her eyes out. However, one or two minnows who had been enjoying the shade below the water lily leaf, had overheard the two frogs talking, and the little girl's bitter sobs. They decided to do something about it. So they nibbled away at the lily stem till it broke and drifted away in the weak current. A dancing butterfly had an idea: "Throw me the end of your belt! I'll help you to move a little faster!" Thumbelina gratefully did so, and the leaf soon floated away from the frog pond. But other dangers lay ahead. A large beetle snatched Thumbelina with his strong feet and took her away to his home at the top of a leafy tree. "Isn't she pretty?" he said to his friends. But they pointed out that she was far too different. So the beetle took her down the tree and set her free. It was summertime, and Thumbelina wandered all by herself amongst the flowers and through the long grass. She had pollen for her meals and drank the dew. Then the rainy season came, bringing nastyweather. The poor child found it hard to find food and shelter. When winter set in, she suffered from the cold and felt terrible pangs of hunger. One day, as Thumbelina roamed helplessly over the bare meadows, she met a large spider who promised to help her. He took her to a hollow tree and guarded the door with a stout web. Then he brought her some dried chestnuts and called his friends to come and admire her beauty. But just like the beetles, all the other spiders persuaded Thumbelina's rescuer to let her go. Crying her heart out, and quite certain that nobody wanted her because she was ugly, Thumbelina left the spider's house. As she wandered, shivering with the cold, suddenly she came across a solid little cottage, made of twigs and dead leaves. Hopefully, she knocked on the door. It was opened by a field mouse. "What are you doing outside in this weather?" he asked. "Come in and warm yourself." Comfortable and cozy, the field mouse's home was stocked with food. For her keep, Thumbelina did the housework and told the mouse stories. One day, the field mouse said a friend was coming to visit them. "He's a very rich mole, and has a lovely house. He wears a splendid black fur coat, but he's dreadfully shortsighted. He needs company and he'd like to marry you!" Thumbelina did not relish the idea. However, when the mole came, she sang sweetly to him and he fell head over heels in love. The mole invited Thumbelina and the field mouse to visit him, but . . . to their surprise and horror, they came upon a swallow in the tunnel. It looked dead. Mole nudged it wi his foot, saying: "That'll teach her! She should have come underground instead of darting about the sky all summer!" Thumbelina was so shocked by such cruel words that later, she crept back unseen to the tunnel. And every day, the little girl went to nurse the swallow and tenderly give it food. In the meantime, the swallow told Thumbelina its tale. Jagged by a thorn, it had been unable to follow its companions to a warmer climate. "It's kind of you to nurse me," it told Thumbelina. But, in spring, the swallow flew away, after offering to take the little girl with it. All summer, Thumbelina did her best to avoid marrying the mole. The little girl thought fearfully of how she'd have to live underground forever. On the eve of her wedding, she asked to spend a day in the open air. As she gently fingered a flower, she heard a familiar song: "Winter's on its way and I'll be off to warmer lands. Come with me!" Thumbelina quickly clung to her swallow friend, and the bird soared into the sky. They flew over plains and hills till they reached a country of flowers. The swallow gently laid Thumbelina in a blossom. There she met a tiny, white-winged fairy: the King of the Flower Fairies. Instantly, he asked her to marry him. Thumbelina eagerly said "yes", and sprouting tiny white wings, she became the Flower Queen!rsion

Тагальский

alice in wonderland tagalog story

Последнее обновление: 2020-02-09
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Источник: Анонимно
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Английский

The Sarimanok is a legendary bird of the Maranao people who originate from Mindanao, a major island in the Philippines. It comes from the words “sari” and “manok.” “Sari” means cloth or garment, which is generally of assorted colors. Manòk, which makes up part of its name, is a Philippine word for chicken. It is the legendary bird that has become a ubiquitous symbol of Maranao art. It is depicted as a fowl with colorful wings and feathered tail, holding a fish on its beak or talons. The head is profusely decorated with scroll, leaf, and spiral motifs. It is said to be a symbol of good fortune. The Sarimanok is derived from a totem bird of the Maranao people, called Itotoro. According to the Maranao people, the Itotoro SARIMANOK.jpg is a medium to the spirit world via its unseen twin spirit bird called Inikadowa. According to the tradition, the Sarimanok is never displayed by itself. It must be displayed with the set of flags, standards and vexilloids. At present, this is not totally true; sarimanok may be placed on the top of the umbrella of a Sultan or dignitary, and also, the Mindanao State University has adopted it for the graduation exercises following a non-traditional use. Various versions of the legend of the Sarimanok were recorded. One legend tells of the daughter of the sultan of Lanao, named Sari. Sari was loved by her father and people because of her beauty and kindness. On her eighteenth birthday, a feast was set to celebrate the occasion. A cock/chicken (manok) with bright, glowing feathers flew into the middle of the feast, shocking all the people there. To everyone’s amazement, the cock transformed into a handsome prince. The prince stated that he has been watching over and protecting Sari since she was born, and that it was time that he took her to be with him. With this he transformed back into a cock and took Sari, flying away into the sun. Both he and the princess were never seen again. The loss of his daughter brought grief to the sultan and he had the best craftsman in his lands to carve an image of the magical cock that took her daughter. Another version is about the romantic relationship between Raja Indarapatra and the Maranao moon goddess, who comes down to earth every Friday. Raja Indarapatra eventually joined the goddess to her realm forever by riding the Sarimanok.

Тагальский

buod ng syon

Последнее обновление: 2019-10-04
Частота использования: 1
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Источник: Анонимно

Английский

She was a large woman with a large purse that had everything in it but hammer and nails. It had a long strap, and she carried it slung across her shoulder. It was about eleven o’clock at night, and she was walking alone, when a boy ran up behind her and tried to snatch her purse. The strap broke with the single tug the boy gave it from behind. But the boy’s weight and the weight of the purse combined caused him to lose his balance so, intsead of taking off full blast as he had hoped, the boy fell on his back on the sidewalk, and his legs flew up. the large woman simply turned around and kicked him right square in his blue-jeaned sitter. Then she reached down, picked the boy up by his shirt front, and shook him until his teeth rattled. After that the woman said, “Pick up my pocketbook, boy, and give it here.” She still held him. But she bent down enough to permit him to stoop and pick up her purse. Then she said, “Now ain’t you ashamed of yourself?” Firmly gripped by his shirt front, the boy said, “Yes’m.” The woman said, “What did you want to do it for?” The boy said, “I didn’t aim to.” She said, “You a lie!” By that time two or three people passed, stopped, turned to look, and some stood watching. “If I turn you loose, will you run?” asked the woman. “Yes’m,” said the boy. “Then I won’t turn you loose,” said the woman. She did not release him. “I’m very sorry, lady, I’m sorry,” whispered the boy. “Um-hum! And your face is dirty. I got a great mind to wash your face for you. Ain’t you got nobody home to tell you to wash your face?” “No’m,” said the boy. “Then it will get washed this evening,” said the large woman starting up the street, dragging the frightened boy behind her. He looked as if he were fourteen or fifteen, frail and willow-wild, in tennis shoes and blue jeans. The woman said, “You ought to be my son. I would teach you right from wrong. Least I can do right now is to wash your face. Are you hungry?” “No’m,” said the being dragged boy. “I just want you to turn me loose.”

Тагальский

salamat sa iyo, ginang ng Langston Hughes

Последнее обновление: 2017-01-02
Частота использования: 1
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Источник: Анонимно

Английский

alice in wonderland tagalog veOnce upon a time . . . there lived a woman who had no children. She dreamed of having a little girl, but time went by, and her dream never came true. She then went to visit a witch, who gave her a magic grain of barley. She planted it in a flower pot. And the very next day, the grain had turned into a lovely flower, rather like a tulip. The woman softly kissed its half-shut petals. And as though by magic, the flower opened in full blossom. Inside sat a tiny girl, no bigger than a thumb. The woman called her Thumbelina. For a bed she had a walnut shell, violet petals for her mattress and a rose petal blanket. In the daytime, she played in a tulip petal boat, floating on a plate of water. Using two horse hairs as oars, Thumbelina sailed around her little lake, singing and singing in a gentle sweet voice. Then one night, as she lay fast asleep in her walnut shell, a large frog hopped through a hole in the window pane. As she gazed down at Thumbelina, she said to herself: "How pretty she is! She'd make the perfect bride for my own dear son!" She picked up Thumbelina, walnut shell and all, and hopped into the garden. Nobody saw her go.Back at the pond, her fat ugly son, who always did as mother told him, was pleased with her choice. But mother frog was afraid that her pretty prisoner might run away. So she carried Thumbellna out to a water lily leaf ln the middle of the pond. "She can never escape us now," said the frog to her son. "And we have plenty of time to prepare a new home for you and your bride." Thumbelina was left all alone. She felt so desperate. She knew she would never be able to escape the fate that awaited her with the two horrid fat frogs. All she could do was cry her eyes out. However, one or two minnows who had been enjoying the shade below the water lily leaf, had overheard the two frogs talking, and the little girl's bitter sobs. They decided to do something about it. So they nibbled away at the lily stem till it broke and drifted away in the weak current. A dancing butterfly had an idea: "Throw me the end of your belt! I'll help you to move a little faster!" Thumbelina gratefully did so, and the leaf soon floated away from the frog pond. But other dangers lay ahead. A large beetle snatched Thumbelina with his strong feet and took her away to his home at the top of a leafy tree. "Isn't she pretty?" he said to his friends. But they pointed out that she was far too different. So the beetle took her down the tree and set her free. It was summertime, and Thumbelina wandered all by herself amongst the flowers and through the long grass. She had pollen for her meals and drank the dew. Then the rainy season came, bringing nastyweather. The poor child found it hard to find food and shelter. When winter set in, she suffered from the cold and felt terrible pangs of hunger. One day, as Thumbelina roamed helplessly over the bare meadows, she met a large spider who promised to help her. He took her to a hollow tree and guarded the door with a stout web. Then he brought her some dried chestnuts and called his friends to come and admire her beauty. But just like the beetles, all the other spiders persuaded Thumbelina's rescuer to let her go. Crying her heart out, and quite certain that nobody wanted her because she was ugly, Thumbelina left the spider's house. As she wandered, shivering with the cold, suddenly she came across a solid little cottage, made of twigs and dead leaves. Hopefully, she knocked on the door. It was opened by a field mouse. "What are you doing outside in this weather?" he asked. "Come in and warm yourself." Comfortable and cozy, the field mouse's home was stocked with food. For her keep, Thumbelina did the housework and told the mouse stories. One day, the field mouse said a friend was coming to visit them. "He's a very rich mole, and has a lovely house. He wears a splendid black fur coat, but he's dreadfully shortsighted. He needs company and he'd like to marry you!" Thumbelina did not relish the idea. However, when the mole came, she sang sweetly to him and he fell head over heels in love. The mole invited Thumbelina and the field mouse to visit him, but . . . to their surprise and horror, they came upon a swallow in the tunnel. It looked dead. Mole nudged it wi his foot, saying: "That'll teach her! She should have come underground instead of darting about the sky all summer!" Thumbelina was so shocked by such cruel words that later, she crept back unseen to the tunnel. And every day, the little girl went to nurse the swallow and tenderly give it food. In the meantime, the swallow told Thumbelina its tale. Jagged by a thorn, it had been unable to follow its companions to a warmer climate. "It's kind of you to nurse me," it told Thumbelina. But, in spring, the swallow flew away, after offering to take the little girl with it. All summer, Thumbelina did her best to avoid marrying the mole. The little girl thought fearfully of how she'd have to live underground forever. On the eve of her wedding, she asked to spend a day in the open air. As she gently fingered a flower, she heard a familiar song: "Winter's on its way and I'll be off to warmer lands. Come with me!" Thumbelina quickly clung to her swallow friend, and the bird soared into the sky. They flew over plains and hills till they reached a country of flowers. The swallow gently laid Thumbelina in a blossom. There she met a tiny, white-winged fairy: the King of the Flower Fairies. Instantly, he asked her to marry him. Thumbelina eagerly said "yes", and sprouting tiny white wings, she became the Flower Queen!rsion

Тагальский

Alice sa wonderland tagalog bersyon

Последнее обновление: 2016-06-29
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Источник: Анонимно
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Английский

One day Monki and Makil carried out a plan. Makil let his wife place a piece of white cloth over his body, cry a kandidiagao (a cry of grief), and say, "Why did Makil die? He was very good to all the people! He planted sweet fruits and plenty of sugarcane." When the monkeys heard Monki's cry, they decided to help her. The leader of the monkeys said, "We shall help Monki, because it is really true that Makil was a good man. He always planted fruits for us." So all the monkeys went to the house of Monki. The leader of the monkeys asked her, "What can we do? Can we help you? Please tell us how we can help you!" Monki replied, "Oh, my friends, Makil will not die if you help him sit up." So they helped Makil sit up. The leader asked, "Can you tell us what else we can do to help you?" "Oh, my friend monkeys, you are very good to me!" continued Monki. "Makil will not die if you help him stand up." So they helped him stand up. "What else can we do, Monki?" asked the leader of the monkeys. "Oh, my friend monkeys, if you give this kampilan (long combat sword) to Makil, I promise you that we shall plant more sugarcane just for you," said Monki. When Amomantaragaga saw the kampilan he became wary and went out of the house. As soon as Makil received the kampilan, Monki closed the door and Makil killed all the monkeys in the house. Only Amomantaragaga escaped. One day Makil and Monki had another good idea. They made a litag (bamboo trap) in order to catch Amomantaragaga. Early in the morning, they went out to see if the trap had caught the monkey. In fact it had caught an animal, but it did not look like a monkey. They were annoyed when they came near and found out that the animal was a heron. This heron was called Tatalaonga. "Why are you here, Tatalaonga?" asked Makil. "I'll kill you because you are the reason why I did not catch Amomantaragaga." "Oh, datu, please don't kill me," pleaded the heron. "If you set me free, I'll go and kill Amomantaragaga myself!" So Makil set the heron free. Tatalaonga asked Makil to make a raft from pieces of sugarcane. When the raft was finished, Makil brought it to the river, and Tatalaonga perched on it. Drifting along, Tatalaonga passed Amomantaragaga by the banks of the river and invited the monkey to go rafting with him. The two continued down the river on the raft. Tatalaonga took a piece of sugarcane to use as a pole to move the raft, and then he took another one and gave it to Amomantaragaga, who greedily ate the pole. The monkey ate one cane after another, until only one piece was left. At that instance, Tatalaonga flew away and left Amomantaragaga to drown in the river. Monki and Makil and the sultan of Agamaniyog and his people were happy to be rid of the pestering monkeys.

Тагальский

One day Monki and Makil carried out a plan. Makil let his wife place a piece of white cloth over his body, cry a kandidiagao (a cry of grief), and say, "Why did Makil die? He was very good to all the people! He planted sweet fruits and plenty of sugarcane." When the monkeys heard Monki's cry, they decided to help her. The leader of the monkeys said, "We shall help Monki, because it is really true that Makil was a good man. He always planted fruits for us." So all the monkeys went to the house of Monki. The leader of the monkeys asked her, "What can we do? Can we help you? Please tell us how we can help you!" Monki replied, "Oh, my friends, Makil will not die if you help him sit up." So they helped Makil sit up. The leader asked, "Can you tell us what else we can do to help you?" "Oh, my friend monkeys, you are very good to me!" continued Monki. "Makil will not die if you help him stand up." So they helped him stand up. "What else can we do, Monki?" asked the leader of the monkeys. "Oh, my friend monkeys, if you give this kampilan (long combat sword) to Makil, I promise you that we shall plant more sugarcane just for you," said Monki. When Amomantaragaga saw the kampilan he became wary and went out of the house. As soon as Makil received the kampilan, Monki closed the door and Makil killed all the monkeys in the house. Only Amomantaragaga escaped. One day Makil and Monki had another good idea. They made a litag (bamboo trap) in order to catch Amomantaragaga. Early in the morning, they went out to see if the trap had caught the monkey. In fact it had caught an animal, but it did not look like a monkey. They were annoyed when they came near and found out that the animal was a heron. This heron was called Tatalaonga. "Why are you here, Tatalaonga?" asked Makil. "I'll kill you because you are the reason why I did not catch Amomantaragaga." "Oh, datu, please don't kill me," pleaded the heron. "If you set me free, I'll go and kill Amomantaragaga myself!" So Makil set the heron free. Tatalaonga asked Makil to make a raft from pieces of sugarcane. When the raft was finished, Makil brought it to the river, and Tatalaonga perched on it. Drifting along, Tatalaonga passed Amomantaragaga by the banks of the river and invited the monkey to go rafting with him. The two continued down the river on the raft. Tatalaonga took a piece of sugarcane to use as a pole to move the raft, and then he took another one and gave it to Amomantaragaga, who greedily ate the pole. The monkey ate one cane after another, until only one piece was left. At that instance, Tatalaonga flew away and left Amomantaragaga to drown in the river. Monki and Makil and the sultan of Agamaniyog and his people were happy to be rid of the pestering monkeys.

Последнее обновление: 2015-09-06
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Источник: Анонимно
Предупреждение: Содержит скрытое HTML-форматирование

Английский

Leon Mendoza had been floating in the East River for three days when his corpse was fished out by the police. “Whoever killed him nearly botched the job,” Inspector Wilson told a battery of reporters. “The killer first attempted to strangle him with Mendoza’s own bow tie. Apparently when that didn’t work, he resorted to a forty-inch piece of tarred hemp rope — the kind used for marine purposes. It did the job properly. “Mendoza’s pockets were empty,” the inspector continued. “When found, he had on a white shirt with French cuffs and blue trousers, but no jacket.” An hour after the first editions hit the streets, Neil the Nose was banging on the inspector’s door. He had, as usual, information to peddle. “I found this,” the grimy little informer said. He held out tie clasp fashioned in the shape of a catboat. On the back was engraved, “To LM from GB.” “LM is Leon Mendoza and GB is Gwynneth Baltrow, his old flame,” volunteered Neil. “Could be Gwynneth,” conceded the inspector. “We’ll never know. She committed suicide last month. Where’d you find the clasp?” “That bit of information will cost you,” snapped Neil. “I figure if you knew where he lost the clasp, you’d know where he was attacked, and if — “ “Enough!” roared the inspector. “I’ll pay — with this” He drove the toe of his shoe into the seat of Neil’s pants. “He deserves worse,” commented Malcolm, opening the door as Neil’s flew by. Why was Neil given the boot?

Тагальский

traslator google

Последнее обновление: 2015-07-13
Частота использования: 1
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Источник: Анонимно

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